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Subject:Repost: Any help in dating my (most likely) Chinese/Japanese teapot?
Posted By: Brandon mccloskey Wed, Feb 07, 2018 IP: 173.191.104.106

If anybody can give me even a rough estimate of how old this is or how to figure it out myself I would be very grateful! :) I noticed it has two or three scratches on the bottom made by the potter, The only thing I can relate this to is some ming era rustic pottery but it doesn't look Ming to me the rattan handle I don't believe was used then?







Subject:Re: Repost: Any help in dating my (most likely) Chinese/Japanese teapot?
Posted By: Robert Thu, Feb 08, 2018

Looking at the sand-tempered clay body and the opaque feldspar glaze it is almost certainly a Mashiko or Mashiko style teapot, probably made in the 20th century. Pottery making in Mashiko (AKO Pottery Town) is thought to have started after about 1850, in the late Edo Period. Shoji Hamada, who potted with Bernard Leach and other greats in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, is probably its best known potter and greatest proponent of the style. The emphasis was on simple, rustic, hand-thrown and hand-built pots, with a non-pretentious beauty and a certain practicality. The style persisted and became popular with latter Western "Art Potters", especially in America in the 1950s (i.e., after World War II) throughout the 1970s. Sand tempered clay bodies also feature prominently in these pots.

Subject:Re: Repost: Any help in dating my (most likely) Chinese/Japanese teapot?
Posted By: Robert Thu, Feb 08, 2018

Correction/Addition to previous post - While the Mashiko pottery "style" was firmly established by around 1900 or the early 20th c, Hamada himself did not establish a kiln there until the 1920s and did most of his work from that time through the late 1960s. He died in 1978. To learn more try a Google search on: Hamada, Mashiko, Soetsu Yanagi, and Mingei (Japanese folk art).

Subject:Re: Repost: Any help in dating my (most likely) Chinese/Japanese teapot?
Posted By: Brandon mccloskey Sat, Feb 10, 2018

Thank you so much Robert! You are spot on, I looked up the things you mentioned and immediately saw that this is the style I was thinking of! Now if only there were a way to tell if it is a Japanese pot by someone like Yanagi or an american pot by someone like Warren Mackenzie?


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