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Subject:Japanese Sharkskin Coralene porcelain ? - Help with Mark?
Posted By: Elke Wed, Jun 06, 2018 IP: 78.51.140.46

Hi folks, dear experts and Japanese-talking people,

could anybody help me with the identification of this nice tray, I found the other day. There was an old handwritten label on it, probably by the former antiques dealer or collector, which read: "Cranes in front of mount Fuji, Marked "Takeuchi", porcelain tray, probably Seto, around 1920, 37 cm x 28 cm (= 14,5x 11 inches)".

What do the expert say, especially the mark is of interest - does it really read "Takeuchi"? could it be around 1920 or even be older?

Thanks in advance,

Elke, Germany








Subject:Re: Japanese Sharkskin Coralene porcelain ? - Help with Mark?
Posted By: Bill H Thu, Jun 07, 2018

All Takeuchi signatures I've seen previously on Japanese sharkskin or Coralene-type wares were that of Takeuchi Chubei, using the characters "竹内造" (Takeuchi Zo - Made by Takeuchi). The mark on your tray appears to be "武内造", which can also be read as "Takeuchi zo - Made by Takeuchi", but the different "Take" character leaves the question of "Chubei or not" pending.

Here are some photos of an early vase with a typical mark beginning at the top with the two characters "特許", which read literally from the right as "Special Permit". The permit refers here to a monopoly patent, the license number of which is read from the right beneath as "二二五二五一五" (2252515). Finally, "竹内造" appears at the bottom in a vertical stack (the function of what looks like another "uchi" character at the left is a mystery to me).

My past research on the subject suggests these patent marks came into use circa 1885, after the establishment of the first Japanese Patent Office. I think there were changes to the patent law in Japan when the USA implemented labeling requirements under the McKinley Tariff Act in 1890. If this assumption is correct, then vases with such markings probably date to between 1885-1890, and your vase could date earlier or later, but in either case might involve another member of the same family as Takeuchi Chubei.

I've also read somewhere that the manufacture of sharkskin wares in Japan had quite a short span, due to the expense of the process and difficulties in the firing process. That and the red mark potentially could bode toward your tray being earlier, but we need to hear the Japanese experts before reaching that conclusion.

Best regards,

Bill H.









Subject:Re: Japanese Sharkskin Coralene porcelain ? - Help with Mark?
Posted By: Elke Fri, Jun 08, 2018

Thank you very much, Bill. Your fruitful answers and your knowledge is always welcomend. and also thanky very much for the interesing fotos.

Greetings from Germany,
Elke

Subject:Re: Japanese Sharkskin Coralene porcelain ? - Help with Mark?
Posted By: Billy D Sat, Jun 09, 2018

Many manufacturers just slapped on a paper label saying "Made in Japan" or "Japan" as law dis not require a permanent mark. So you really cannot use that rule on most items.

Subject:Re: Japanese Sharkskin Coralene porcelain ? - Help with Mark?
Posted By: TD Thu, Jun 07, 2018

The mark 武内 is “Takeuchi.”

If you do a search by clicking on the link at the top right hand side you will find more info on this artist of the late Meiji period.

Subject:Re: Japanese Sharkskin Coralene porcelain ? - Help with Mark?
Posted By: Martin Michels Thu, Jun 07, 2018

I totally agree with Bill H's explanation, although I never seen a mark of Takeuchi 竹内 Chubei written in this way 武内. But looking at your piece it must be something by Takeuchi CHubei.

I did found a mark with the same name as yours, however, that is a Satsuma piece, so no match with yours.

Regards,
Martin.




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